Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Soil-landscape model helps predict potassium supply in vineyards

Authors

Anthony T. O'Geen
Stuart Pettygrove
Randal Southard
Hideomi Minoshima
Paul S. Verdegaal

Authors Affiliations

A.T. O'Geen is Cooperative Extension Soils Specialist, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis, San Joaquin County; S. Pettygrove is Cooperative Extension Soils Specialist, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis, San Joaquin County; R. Southard is Professor, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis, San Joaquin County; H. Minoshima is Graduate Student, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis, San Joaquin County; P.S. Verdegaal is Cooperative Extension Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension, San Joaquin County.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 62(4):195-201. DOI:10.3733/ca.v062n04p195. October 2008.

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Abstract

The Lodi Winegrape District is one of the largest in California and encompasses a wide diversity of wine-grape varieties, production systems and soils, which complicates grape nutrient management To identify regions within this district that have similar nutrient-management needs, we are developing a soil-landscape model based on soil survey information. Our current model identifies five regions within the Lodi district with presumed relationships between soil properties and potassium-supplying ability. Region 1 has weakly developed, clay-rich soils in basin alluvium; region 2 has weakly developed, coarser-textured soils on recent alluvial fans, flood plains and stream terraces; region 3 has moderately developed soils on low terraces derived from granitic alluvium; region 4 has highly developed soils on high terraces derived from mixed alluvium; and region 5 has weakly developed soils formed on undulating volcanic terrain. Field and lab studies of soils in these regions show that our model is reasonable in concept, but that it must be fine-tuned to account for differing degrees of soil variability within each region in order to make realistic nutrient-management predictions.

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O'Geen A, Pettygrove S, Southard R, Minoshima H, Verdegaal P. 2008. Soil-landscape model helps predict potassium supply in vineyards. Hilgardia 62(4):195-201. DOI:10.3733/ca.v062n04p195
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