Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Vineyard floor management affects soil, plant nutrition, and grape yield and quality

Authors

Richard Smith
Larry Bettiga
Michael Cahn
Kendra Baumgartner
Louise E. Jackson
Tiffany Bensen

Authors Affiliations

R. Smith are Farm Advisors, UC Cooperative Extension (UCCE), Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito counties; L. Bettiga are Farm Advisors, UC Cooperative Extension (UCCE), Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito counties; M. Cahn are Farm Advisors, UC Cooperative Extension (UCCE), Monterey, Santa Cruz and San Benito counties; K. Baumgartner is Research Plant Pathologist, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Department of Plant Pathology, UC Davis; L.E. Jackson is Professor and Cooperative Extension Specialist, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC DavisL.E. Jackson is Professor and Cooperative Extension Specialist, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis; T. Bensen is Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Biology, University of Mississippi.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 62(4):184-190. DOI:10.3733/ca.v062n04p184. October 2008.

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Abstract

Management of the vineyard floor affects soil and crop productivity, as well as runoff and sediment that leave the vineyard. In Monterey County, weed control is typically conducted in a 4-foot-wide area under the vines, while cover crops are planted in the middles between vine rows. This 5-year multidisciplinary study in a low rainfall vineyard evaluated the impact of weed control strategies (cultivation, pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides) in the vine rows, factorially arranged with three cover-crop treatments in the middles. We studied soil compaction, moisture and runoff; vine and soil nutrition; soil microbial biomass and mycorrhizae; and grape yield and quality. The late-maturing 'Trios 102' triticale used more water during the vine growing season than the earlier maturing 'Merced' rye. Cover crops increased organic matter and microbial biomass in the middles and reduced sediment loss. Weed control treatments did not affect crop yield or soil nutritional and microbiological parameters, but cultivation increased soil compaction at 4 to 7 inches deep. Weed control strategies and cover crops must be chosen carefully to maximize benefits and minimize negative environmental impacts.

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Smith R, Bettiga L, Cahn M, Baumgartner K, Jackson L, Bensen T. 2008. Vineyard floor management affects soil, plant nutrition, and grape yield and quality. Hilgardia 62(4):184-190. DOI:10.3733/ca.v062n04p184
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