Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Effectiveness of tensiometers and electrical resistance sensors varies with soil conditions

Authors

Blaine Hanson
Douglas Peters
Steve Orloff

Authors Affiliations

B.R. Hanson is Extension Irrigation and Drainage Specialist; D. Peters is Staff Research Associate, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis; S. Orloffis Farm Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension, Siskiyou County.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 54(3):47-50. DOI:10.3733/ca.v054n03p47. May 2000.

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Abstract

Tensiometers, gypsum blocks, Watermark blocks and an electromagnetic conductivity meter were evaluated for their response to changes in soil moisture content. Tensiometers and Watermark blocks had similar responses, but the blocks operated better than tensiometers in drier soil. Gypsum blocks did not respond until some threshold moisture content was reached. The electromagnetic conductivity meter responded to changes in moisture content in fine-textured soil, but it did not respond in sandy soil.

References

Hanson B, Schwankl L, Fulton A. Scheduling Irrigations: When and How Much Water to Apply. UC Division of Ag and Nat Res Publication 3396 1999. p.204. https://doi.org/10.1097/00010694-198905000-00009

Hanson B, Peters D, Orloff S. 2000. Effectiveness of tensiometers and electrical resistance sensors varies with soil conditions. Hilgardia 54(3):47-50. DOI:10.3733/ca.v054n03p47
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