Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Splitting of Navel oranges: Studies indicate local temperature and humidity more closely related to incidence of injury than is soil moisture content

Authors

O. C. Taylor
G. A. Cahoon
L. H. Stolxy

Authors Affiliations

O. C. Taylor is Assistant Horticulturist, University of California, Riverside; G. A. Cahoon is Assistant Horticulturist, University of California, Riverside; L. H. Stolzy is Assistant Irrigation Engineer, University of California, Riverside.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 12(3):6-10. DOI:10.3733/ca.v012n03p6. March 1958.

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Abstract

Crop loss—of 20% or more—from the splitting of Navel oranges is no new problem. The trouble has plagued orange growers the world over and the general opinion seems to be that internal pressure develops within the fruit—probably as a result of extreme changes in moisture content associated with certain weather and soil moisture conditions—which ruptures the rind at the weakest point, the navel opening. Once started, the split usually expands rapidly dividing the fruit into two or more segments.

Taylor O, Cahoon G, Stolxy L. 1958. Splitting of Navel oranges: Studies indicate local temperature and humidity more closely related to incidence of injury than is soil moisture content. Hilgardia 12(3):6-10. DOI:10.3733/ca.v012n03p6
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