Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Environmentally related restrictions on the timber harvesting capability of a national forest: A case study

Author

Robert J. Hrubes

Author Affiliations

Robert J. Hrubes was former Research Assistant in the Department of Forestry and Resource Management, University of California, Berkeley, has returned to his position as Forest Economist at the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Berkeley, California.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 52(1):1-37. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v52n01p037. January 1984.

PDF of full article, Cite this article

Abstract

In response to influences predominantly external to the United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, and beginning in the 1970s, the latitude and intensity of timber management activities on the National Forests have been increasingly limited through the imposition of environmentally induced constraints. Quantitative information on the relative costs and benefits of imposing environmentally induced constraints is generally lacking, and this has hindered the proper evaluation of the constraints. To generate some of this needed information, the author examined the effects of meeting environmental goals on National Forest timber harvesting capability by developing 20 simulated harvest schedules for a case study in northern California. Using available data and the simulation model FOR-PLAN, the schedules were designed to identify the effects of land withdrawal, retention of old-growth stands, minimum rotation, geographic dispersion, and limitation on the use of herbicides on allowable timber cutting. Monitored indices included first-decade harvesting, total harvest in the first five decades, long-run sustained-yield average, species concentration, acres clearcut, and distribution of ending-age classes. In addition, these economic indices were monitored by two demand formulations (present net worth and present net benefit after 16 decades), total costs and revenues in the first decade, and cost per million cubic feet. Two different price assumptions were modeled—each representing distinctly contrasting conditions. The results suggest that the allowable harvest capability of the case-study forest was significantly reduced when measures were taken to reach environmental goals.

Literature Cited

Berck P. The economics of timber: a renewable resource in the long run. Bell. J. Econ. 1979. 10:447-62. no. 2: DOI: 10.2307/3003346 [CrossRef]

Davis K. P. American Forest Management. 1954. New York: McGraw-Hill. 519p.

Haynes R. W., Connaughton K. P., Adams D. M. Stumpage price projections for selected western species. USDA Forest Service Research Note PNW-367. 1980. Portland, Oregon: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station.

Haynes R. W. Projections of the demand for national forest stumpage, by region, 1980-2030 1981. p.13. USDA Forest Service Research Paper PNW-282, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Portland, Oregon

Hrubes R.J. The USDA Forest Service in the environmental era: institutional and programmatic change 1981. p.272. PhD thesis. University of California, Berkeley

Hrubes R. J., Connaughton K. P., Sassaman R. W. Roadless area-intensive management tradeoffs on the Sierra National Forest, California 1979. p.11. USDA Forest Service Research Paper PSW-149, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Berkeley, California

Johnson K. Norman. Forplan User’s Manual. 1979. Ft. Collins, Colorado: USDA Forest Service.

Johnson K. N., Scheurman H. L. Techniques for prescribing optimal timber harvest and investment under different objectives. Forest Science Monograph. 1977. 18:31

Mead W.J. Competition and oligopsony in the Douglas-fir lumber industry. 1966. Berkeley: Univ. Calif. Press. 276p.

Randall R. M., Fight R. D., Johnson K. N., Connaughton K. P., Sassaman R. W. Roadless area-intensive management tradeoffs on Pacific northwest national forests 1979. p.69. Research Paper PNW-258, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, USDA Forest Service, Portland, Oregon

Row C., Fred Kaiser H., Sessions J. Discount rate for long-term Forest Service investments. J. For. 1981. 79:6 vol. pp. 367-68

Usda Forest Service. Douglas-fir supply study; alternative programs for increasing timber supplies from national forest lands. 1969. Portland, Oregon: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station. 53p.

U.S. Water Resources Council. Obers projections. 1974. 4: vol. States. Washington, D.C

Vaux H. J., Zivnuska J. A. Forest production goals: a critical analysis. Land Economics. 1952. 18(4):318-27. DOI: 10.2307/3159480 [CrossRef]

Walker J. L. An economic model for optimizing the rate of timber harvesting 1971. p.177. PhD thesis, University of Washington, Seattle

Hrubes R. 1984. Environmentally related restrictions on the timber harvesting capability of a national forest: A case study. Hilgardia 52(1):1-37. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v52n01p037
Webmaster Email: wsuckow@ucanr.edu