Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Parasitoid wasp controls blue gum psyllid

Authors

Donald L. Dahlsten
David L. Rowney
William A. Copper
Richard L. Tassan
William E. Chaney
Karen L. Robb
Steven Tjosvold
Mary Bianchi
Priscilla Lane

Authors Affiliations

D.L. Dahlsten is Professor, Staff Research Associates, College of Natural Resources, Center for Biological Control, UC Berkeley; D.L. Rowney is Biostatistician Staff Research Associates, College of Natural Resources, Center for Biological Control, UC Berkeley; W.A. Copper, Staff Research Associates, College of Natural Resources, Center for Biological Control, UC Berkeley; R.L. Tassan are Staff Research Associates, College of Natural Resources, Center for Biological Control, UC Berkeley; W.E. Chaney, Farm Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension, Monterey, San Diego, Santa Cruz and San Luis Obispo counties; K.L. Robb, Farm Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension, Monterey, San Diego, Santa Cruz and San Luis Obispo counties; S. Tjosvold, Farm Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension, Monterey, San Diego, Santa Cruz and San Luis Obispo counties; M. Bianchi, Farm Advisor, UC Cooperative Extension, Monterey, San Diego, Santa Cruz and San Luis Obispo counties; P. Lane is Entomologist, Sonoma County Department of Agriculture.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 52(1):31-34. DOI:10.3733/ca.v052n01p31. January 1998.

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Abstract

The blue gum psyllid was first discovered in North America in Monterey County in January 1991. Since then it has quickly spread throughout the California coastal area and has became a major pest on Eucalyptus palverulenta in commercial foliage plantations. Large amounts of pesticides have been used to control the psyllid in these plantations. A primary parasitoid wasp, Psyllaephagus pilosus Noyes (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), was found in Australia and New Zealand and released at eight sites in California in spring/summer 1993. As a result, psyllid populations declined somewhat at most sites in 1993, and in 1994 psyllids were no longer a problem. The parasitoid has spread rapidly to other coastal areas.

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Dahlsten D, Rowney D, Copper W, Tassan R, Chaney W, Robb K, Tjosvold S, Bianchi M, Lane P. 1998. Parasitoid wasp controls blue gum psyllid. Hilgardia 52(1):31-34. DOI:10.3733/ca.v052n01p31
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