Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Pot experiments related to the peach replant problem

Author

A. E. Gilmore

Author Affiliations

A. E. Gilmore was Specialist in the Experiment Station, Department of Pomology, Davis.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 34(3):63-78. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v34n03p063. March 1963.

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Abstract

Composting of peach-root substances with two different soils in pot cultures did not prove to be a reliable method of simulating the peach replant problem though peach-root wood sometimes hindered nitrogen availability and in one experiment other root substances depressed the growth of peach seedlings. Successive plantings in pots of these soils did produce the depression. Soil fumigation was an ineffective treatment but steaming effected a partial recovery.

A third soil, less fertile than the other two, did not exhibit the replant depression but was injured by steaming.

Literature Cited

Gilmore A. E. A technique for embryo culture of peaches. Hilgardia. 1950. 20(8):147-70. DOI: 10.3733/hilg.v20n08p147 [CrossRef]

Gilmore A. E. Growth of replanted peach trees. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 1959. 73:99-111.

Gilmore A. E. Competition effects between peach seedlings in pots. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 1962. 80:204-06.

Havis Leon, Gilkinson Anna L. Toxicity of peach roots. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 1947. 50:203-05.

Hilderbrand E. M. Peach root toxicity in a New York orchard. Plant Disease Reporter. 1945. 29(6):179

Hirai J., Nakagawa S., Nanjo Y. Growth of peach seedlings as related to the peach bark added to the soil and some other soil treatments. (In Japanese with English summary.). Studies from the Institute of Horticulture, Kyoto University. 1957. 8:32-37.

Hirano S. Studies on peach sick soil. III. On the toxic substances in peach root. (In Japanese with English summary.). Studies from the Institute of Horticulture, Kyoto University. 1957. 8:27-31.

Proebsting E. L., Gilmore A. E. The relation of peach root toxicity to the re-establishing of peach orchards. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 1940. 38:21-26.

Gilmore A. 1963. Pot experiments related to the peach replant problem. Hilgardia 34(3):63-78. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v34n03p063

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