Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Public health: Control of mosquito-borne encephalitis

Authors

William C. Reeves
Marilyn Milby
James L. Hardy

Authors Affiliations

William C. Reeves is Professor of Public Health with the Department of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720; Marilyn Milby is Specialist Statistician with the Department of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720; James L. Hardy is Professor of Medical Virology with the Department of Biomedical and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 34(3):6-7. DOI:10.3733/ca.v034n03p6. March 1980.

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Abstract

The mosquito control program in California has been uniquely successful, and for practical purposes, the major mosquito-borne diseases, such as encephalitis and malaria, have been effectively controlled in the state in recent years. Much of the original research leading to this success was done by the University of California School of Public Health. Current research is directed at preventing a resurgence of mosquito-borne diseases, with emphasis on surveillance and vector suppression.
Reeves W, Milby M, Hardy J. 1980. Public health: Control of mosquito-borne encephalitis. Hilgardia 34(3):6-7. DOI:10.3733/ca.v034n03p6

Also in this issue:

Public service research at its best

Progress in mosquito control

Public health: Mosquitoes as carriers of viral diseases

Public health: Treehole mosquito may spread canine heartworm

Public health: Encephalitis viruses persist in southern California

Biology, ecology and ethology: Mosquitoes—a by-product of rice culture

Biology, ecology and ethology: Tracking the pasture mosquito

Biology, ecology and ethology: Mosquitoes from trees

Biology, ecology and ethology: Winter mosquitoes go underground in summer

Biology, ecology and ethology: Feeding mechanisms and nutrition of mosquitoes

Biological control and genetics: BTI — a potent new biological weapon

Biological control and genetics: Notonectids

Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Pupfish

Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Hydra

Biological control and genetics: Other mosquito predators: Flatworms

Biological control and genetics: Mosquito fish — an established predator

Biological control and genetics: Genetic manipulation of mosquitoes

Biological control and genetics: Using sterile males to reduce mosquito numbers

Biological control and genetics: Fungi show promise in biological control

Biological control and genetics: Nematodes as biological control agents

Chemical control: Conventional and nonconventional chemicals for mosquito control

Chemical control: Developing better larvicides

Chemical control: Cold fogging for mosquito control

Chemical control: Chemicals of the future

Chemical control: Mosquito resistance to insecticides

Chemical control: Immunochemical methods to detect pesticide residues

Physical and cultural control: Reclaiming alkali soils to reduce mosquito breeding sites

Physical and cultural control: Mosquito and fly problems in dairy waste-water systems

Physical and cultural control: Ecological impact of marshland recirculation ditches

Physical and cultural control: Agricultural drains as mosquito breeding sites

Mosquito control activities of other organizations: World Health Organisation

Mosquito control activities of other organizations: Mosquito Abatement Districts

Mosquito control activities of other organizations: The California Department of Health Services

Pot experiments related to the peach replant problem

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