Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Cobalt-60 gamma-ray irradiator: Opens new doors to biological research at Davis

Authors

R. J. Romani
E. C. Maxie
C. O. Hesse
N. F. Sommer

Authors Affiliations

R. J. Romani is Assistant Pomologist, Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis; E. C. Maxie is Associate Pomologist, Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis; C. O. Hesse is Professor of Pomology and chairman of the Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis; N. F. Sommer is Assistant Pomologist, Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 16(3):2-4. DOI:10.3733/ca.v016n03p2. March 1962.

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Abstract

The new Cobalt-60 gamma-ray irradiator, recently installed at the Davis campus, is designed specifically for biological research. The first application of the new facility involves a study of possibilities for extending the storage life of fruits by irradiation. The irradiator has also been used in studies of genetic mutations and breeding programs for agricultural products. Desirable features for research include a large, uniform radiation field, temperature control, atmospheric modification, and safety of operation. Ten feet of de-ionized water in this pool-type unit maintains a constant radiation barrier against the 32,500 curies of Cobalt-60. The unit is one of the largest of its type in existence.

Romani R, Maxie E, Hesse C, Sommer N. 1962. Cobalt-60 gamma-ray irradiator: Opens new doors to biological research at Davis. Hilgardia 16(3):2-4. DOI:10.3733/ca.v016n03p2
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