Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Cultural control of navel orangeworm in almond orchards

Authors

Curtis E. Engle
Martin M. Barnes

Authors Affiliations

Curtis E. Engle is former Research Assistant, Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside; Martin M. Barnes is Professor, Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 37(9):19-19. DOI:10.3733/ca.v037n09p19. September 1983.

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Abstract

The navel orangeworm overwinters primarily in the larval stage in mummy almonds that remain in the trees or on the ground after harvest. In the spring, moths emerge and lay eggs on the mummy nuts in the trees, and these nuts provide the principal food source of the first-generation larvae. Moths of this generation emerge to infest the current year's almond crop during the hullsplit period. Infestations may reach as high as 30 to 50 percent.

Engle C, Barnes M. 1983. Cultural control of navel orangeworm in almond orchards. Hilgardia 37(9):19-19. DOI:10.3733/ca.v037n09p19
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