Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Chemical weed control in peppers

Authors

Fred L. Whiting
L. F. Lippert
James M. Lyons

Authors Affiliations

Fred L. Whiting is Laboratory Technician, Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California at Riverside; L. F. Lippert is Associate Olericulturist, Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California at Riverside; James M. Lyons is Plant Physiologist, Department of Vegetable Crops, University of California at Riverside.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 24(7):8-9. DOI:10.3733/ca.v024n07p8. July 1970.

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Abstract

WEEDS ARE A PROBLEM in both direct seeded and transplanted bell and chili peppers in California. Cool weather during the early planting season results in slow emergence of direct-seeded pepper seedlings. Grower practice for chilies is to place seed 2 to 4 inches into moist soil and push-hoe the soil from above the germinating seedlings prior to emergence, thus removing the first crop of weed seedlings. Weeds which develop after the last cultivation (lay-by) may also cause difficulties during harvest. The availability of promising chemicals for weed control in peppers prompted the series of studies reported here to evaluate herbicides for direct-seeded and transplanted peppers under both furrow and sprinkler irrigation.

Whiting F, Lippert L, Lyons J. 1970. Chemical weed control in peppers. Hilgardia 24(7):8-9. DOI:10.3733/ca.v024n07p8
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