Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Leaf variegations of perennial delphiniums

Author

Henry H. P. Severin

Author Affiliations

Henry H. P. Severin was Associate Entomologist in the Experiment Station.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 14(10):571-582. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v14n10p571. September 1942.

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Abstract

Abstract does not appear. First page follows.

Leaf variegations and variegations in flowers are not uncommon among ornamental flowering plants. In perennial delphiniums two types of leaf variegations, for which the names “golden-leaf” and “silver-leaf” variegations are proposed, have been observed in seedbeds, in cold frames covered with muslin, in commercial fields of delphiniums grown for seed production and for the cut-flower trade, in nurseries, and in home gardens.

Reichert (14)3 lists among diseases of ornamental plants in Palestine a nonparasitic yellow-leaf discoloration of Delphinium sp.

A leaf variegation somewhat similar to the leaf variegations of delphinium has become serious in certain strawberry varieties, affecting 25 to 50 per cent or all of the plants. The disease has been called “strawberry mosaic” (1), “suspected strawberry mosaic” (2), (8), “noninfectious chlorosis” (4), “June yellows” (11), “yellows” (9), (10), and “gold leaf” (8); and at present the accepted name is “leaf variegation” (3), (5), (6), (7), (12).

Berkeley (1), Guba (8), Plakidas (11), and Demaree and Darrow (7) failed to transmit leaf variegation in strawberries by insects, sap inoculations, and grafting of diseased and healthy runners, and thus presented conclusive evidence that the disease is noninfectious and not caused by a virus.

Berkeley (2) was first to suggest that leaf variegation in strawberries was of genetic origin. Clark (4) expressed the opinion that the disease was caused by a gene mutation and was hereditary. The evidence as a result of breeding work, according to Demaree and Darrow (7), suggests a. sporting or mutation, which has been considered in most instances as the appearance of a recessive character in somatic tissue; they state: “Evidence so far indicates that leaf variegation is not due to a single gene. Even if by selfing no yellow plants appear, this is by no means evidence that a complimentary gene for yellowing may not be in the variety.”

Literature Cited

[1] Berkeley G. H. Strawberry mosaic. Güssow, H. T. Report of the Dominion Botanist [Canada]. 1928. 1927:128-30.

[2] Berkeley G. H. Suspected strawberry mosaic. Güssow, H. T. Report of the Dominion Botanist [Canada]. 1931. 1930:125-26.

[3] Boyd O. C. Leaf variegation of Blakemore strawberry in Massachusetts. The Plant Dis. Reporter. [Issued by the U. S. Bur. Plant Indus.]. 1934. 18:98 (Mimeo.)

[4] Clark J. H. Noninfectious chlorosis of the strawberry. New Jersey Agr. Exp. Sta. Ann. Rept. 1932. 1930-31:279

[5] Darrow G. M. Notes on variegated leaf trouble of strawberries. The Plant Dis. Reporter. [Issued by the U. S. Bur. Plant Indus.]. 1934. 18:26-29. (Mimeo.)

[6] Darrow G. M., Demaree J. B. Relative importance of winter injury and some other troubles to strawberry growers in northern states. The Plant Dis. Reporter. [Issued by the U. S. Bur. Plant Indus.]. 1937. 21:392-94. (Mimeo.)

[7] Demaree J. B., Darrow G. M. Leaf variegation in strawberries not considered a virus disease. The Plant Dis. Reporter. [Issued by the U. S. Bur. Plant Indus.]. 1937. 21:400-3. (Mimeo.)

[8] Guba E. F. “Suspected mosaic” of strawberry. Phytopathology. 1933. 23:654-61.

[9] Millar P. H. Freedom from “yellows” of certain plantings of the Blakemore strawberry. The Plant Dis. Reporter. [Issued by the U. S. Bur. Plant Indus.]. 1937. 21:70-71. (Mimeo.)

[10] Plakidas A. G. Report on strawberry virus project. The Plant Dis. Reporter. [Issued by the U. S. Bur. Plant Indus.]. 1929. 13:129-31. (Mimeo.)

[11] Plakidas A. G. The June yellows of strawberries. Phytopathology. 1932. 22:22

[12] Plakidas A. G. Leaf variegation of the Blakemore strawberry in Louisiana. The Plant Dis. Reporter. [Issued by the U. S. Bur. Plant Indus.]. 1934. 18:46-47. (Mimeo.)

[13] Rawlins T. E., Tompkins C. M. Studies on the effect of carborundum as an abrasive in plant virus inoculation. Phytopathology. 1936. 26:578-87.

[14] Reichert I. Diseases of ornamental plants. Internatl. Bul. Plant Protect. 1940. 14(10):181M-192M.

[15] Severin Henry H. P. Celery calico on perennial delphiniums and certain other host plants. Hilgardia. 1942. 14(8):441-64. DOI: 10.3733/hilg.v14n08p441 [CrossRef]

Severin H. 1942. Leaf variegations of perennial delphiniums. Hilgardia 14(10):571-582. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v14n10p571
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