Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Success of mowing to control yellow starthistle depends on timing and plant's branching form

Authors

Carri B. Benefield
Joseph M. DiTomaso
Guy B. Kyser
Steve B. Orloff
Kenneth R. Churches
Daniel B. Marcum
Glenn A. Nader

Authors Affiliations

C.B. Benefield is Graduate Student, Department of Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; J.M. DiTomaso is Non-Crop Extension Weed Ecologist, Department of Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; G.B. Kyser is Staff Research Associate, Department of Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; S.B. Orloff, is Farm Advisors, Siskiyou, Calaveras, Shasta-Lassen, and Sutter-Yuba-Butte counties, respectively; K.R. Churches, is Farm Advisors, Siskiyou, Calaveras, Shasta-Lassen, and Sutter-Yuba-Butte counties, respectively; D.B. Marcum, is Farm Advisors, Siskiyou, Calaveras, Shasta-Lassen, and Sutter-Yuba-Butte counties, respectively; G.A. Nader is Farm Advisors, Siskiyou, Calaveras, Shasta-Lassen, and Sutter-Yuba-Butte counties, respectively.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 53(2):17-21. DOI:10.3733/ca.v053n02p17. March 1999.

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Abstract

Successful control of yellow starthistle by mowing depends on both proper timing and the plant's form of growth and branching. The branching habit of yellow starthistle is highly variable and is in part dependent on the level of competition with other species for light. Field studies were conducted in five Northern California counties to examine the effects of growth form, timing of mowing and number of mowings on yellow starthistle growth and seed production. Erect, high-branching populations were effectively controlled by a single mowing at early flowering, while sprawling, lowbranching plants were not satisfactorily controlled even by multiple mowings. Mowing should provide an effective tool for yellow starthistle control in an integrated approach with clopyralid treatment, prescribed burning or biological control.

References

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Benefield C, DiTomaso J, Kyser G, Orloff S, Churches K, Marcum D, Nader G. 1999. Success of mowing to control yellow starthistle depends on timing and plant's branching form. Hilgardia 53(2):17-21. DOI:10.3733/ca.v053n02p17
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