Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Influences of forests on snow in the ponderosa-sugar pine-fir zone of the central Sierra Nevada

Author

Joseph Kittredge

Author Affiliations

Joseph Kittredge was Professor of Forestry and Forest Ecologist in the Experiment Station, Berkeley.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 22(1):1-96. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v22n01p001. March 1953.

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Abstract

The critical importance of water supply problems in the San Joaquin Valley indicates a need for reliable information on the possible effects of forests on accumulation, losses, and melting of snow on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada.

The present study was made in part of the Stanislaus National Forest, and covered the seven years, 1934-38 and 1940-41. The aim was to find what kinds, sizes, and densities of forests are most effective in promoting accumulation of snow, in minimizing losses by evaporation, and in retarding and prolonging the period of melting.

Recommendations for improved forest management in relation to water supply are made in the light of the findings for the seven seasons under study.

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Kittredge J. 1953. Influences of forests on snow in the ponderosa-sugar pine-fir zone of the central Sierra Nevada. Hilgardia 22(1):1-96. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v22n01p001
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