Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

The influence of seasonal and other factors on the acceptability and food value of the meat of two subspecies of California deer and of antelope

Authors

Bessie B. Cook
Lois E. Witham
Marion Olmstead
Agnes Fay Morgan

Authors Affiliations

Bessie B. Cook was Assistant Professor of Home Economics and Assistant Biochemist in the California Agricultural Experiment Station, University of California at Berkeley; Agnes Fay Morgan was Professor of Home Economics and Biochemist in the California Agricultural Experiment Station, University of California at Berkeley.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 19(8):265-284. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v19n08p265. June 1949.

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Abstract

Abstract does not appear. First page follows.

Introduction

For many years there has been a controversy over the proper season for hunting deer in the central and southern coast ranges of California. The deer in question are the Columbian black-tailed deer, Odocoileus hemionus columbianus, which inhabits the north coast from the Oregon line south to San Luis Obispo County, and the California mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus californicus, which is found in the area extending from San Luis Obispo County south to Orange County.

Deer in these coastal areas are considered “prime” in August when their antlers are hard and their coats are blue. They enter their breeding season late in September.

One group of public officials and sportsmen believes that the open season should be declared from the time the antlers become hard until the start of the fall rut. The group contends that, from the standpoint of the condition and palatability of the venison and the trophy value of the heads, the deer are prime at this season, and that during the rut, the condition becomes poor and does not improve again until the following year.

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Cook B, Witham L, Olmstead M, Morgan A. 1949. The influence of seasonal and other factors on the acceptability and food value of the meat of two subspecies of California deer and of antelope. Hilgardia 19(8):265-284. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v19n08p265
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