Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Additional host plants of curly top

Author

Henry H. P. Severin

Author Affiliations

Henry H. P. Severin was Assistant Entomologist in the Experiment Station.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 3(20):595-637. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v03n20p595. March 1929.

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Abstract

Abstract does not appear. First page follows.

Introduction

In a recent paper,(9) the host plants of curly top in the families Chenopodiaceae, Leguminosae, and Cucurbitacea were given. Forty varieties of economic plants were reported to be naturally infected with curly top and 120 varieties were experimentally infected with the disease. Eight different species of weeds were demonstrated to be naturally infected with curly top, and nineteen weeds and shrubs to be experimentally infected with the disease.

During 1925 several varieties of peppers failed owing to curly top in the interior regions of California.(6) McKay(5) reported as high as 90 per cent of the peppers affected with curly top at The Dalles, Oregon, during 1926. Crawford(3) found a large percentage of Chili peppers affected with curly top in New Mexico during 1927.

According to Crawford the experimental planting of tobacco (Nicotiana rustica) at the State College, New Mexico, was entirely destroyed by curly top. Tobacco was infected with the disease near Albuquerque. E. G. Beinharts also reported that tobacco was infected with curly top in Arizona.

During the 1925 outbreak of the beet leafhopper, horse-radish was demonstrated to be naturally infected with curly top in the Sacramento Valley.(6) According to McKay,(5) horse-radish was seriously infected with curly top in Oregon during 1926, and in some fields as high as 95 per cent of the crop was diseased.

Bibliography

[1] Carsner E. Susceptibility of various plants to curly-top. Phytopathology. 1919. 9:413-421.

[2] Carsner E. Attenuation of the virus of sugar beet curly-top. Phytopathology. 1925. 15:745-758.

[3] Crawford R. F. Curly top in New Mexico. U. S. Dept. Agr. Official Record. 1927. 6(43):8

[4] Henderson C. F. The susceptibility of some crucifers and one species of legume to curly top. 1928. Unpublished thesis; MS. in University of California Library

[5] McKay M. B. The curly top disease. Seed World. 1928. 23:3840- 72

[6] Severin H. H. P. Crops naturally infected with sugar beet curly-top. Science. 1927. 66:137-138. DOI: 10.1126/science.66.1701.137 [CrossRef]

[7] Severin H. H. P. Transmission of tomato yellows, or curly top of the sugar beet, by Eutettix tenellus (Baker). Hilgardia. 1928. 3:251-274. DOI: 10.3733/hilg.v03n10p251 [CrossRef]

[8] Severin H. H. P. Yellows disease of celery, lettuce and flowering plants transmitted by the six-spotted leafhopper, Cicadula sexnotata (Fall.). Hilgardia. 1929. 3(18):543-582. DOI: 10.3733/hilg.v03n18p543 [CrossRef]

[9] Severin H. H. P., Henderson C. F. Some host plants of curly top. Hilgardia. 1928. 3:339-392. DOI: 10.3733/hilg.v03n13p339 [CrossRef]

Severin H. 1929. Additional host plants of curly top. Hilgardia 3(20):595-637. DOI:10.3733/hilg.v03n20p595
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