Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

California teachers support the Nutrition Competencies new nutrition instruction guidelines

Authors

Nadine Kirkpatrick
Marilyn Briggs
Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr

Authors Affiliations

N. Kirkpatrick is Adjunct Professor, Department of Family and Consumer Science, Sacramento City College, Sacramento; M. Briggs is Doctoral Student Researcher; S. Zidenberg-Cherr is Cooperative Extension Specialist, Department of Nutrition, UC Davis. This project was funded in part by the California Department of Education (CDE), Sacramento, and the UC Davis Food Stamp Nutrition Education program. The authors thank Helen Magnuson of the CDE Nutrition Services Division for being our contact with CDE; teachers of the Petaluma School District for evaluating the Nutrition Competencies survey during the pre-test; and all the California public school teachers who took part in the Nutrition Competencies survey. Special appreciation is given to Mark Hudes of UC Berkeley for his statistical assistance. We also thank Trevor Cherr, Stephanie Cozad, Linh Dang, Anna Jones and Joe Kopshever for their tremendous dedication to subject recruitment and data entry.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 61(1):40-46. DOI:10.3733/ca.v061n01p40. January 2007.

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Abstract

Our research group reviewed, updated and field-tested “Nutrition Competencies for California's Children, Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12,” a document that provides comprehensive and sequential nutrition goals for students. The review process included: (1) comparative analysis with state and national nutrition and health documents; (2) professional input by UC nutrition and education faculty and California Department of Education nutrition staff; (3) review by national, state and local experts in nutrition, education and food service; and (4) field review by and a survey of California public school teachers. The teachers that we surveyed over whelmingly agreed that the final Nutrition Competencies document was age- and academically appropriate for students in their grade levels. More than 81% found the Nutrition Competencies document well-structured and user-friendly. The teachers supported its inclusion in the school curriculum, and requested additional support materials such as lesson plans in order to incorporate nutrition lessons into the core subject areas.

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Kirkpatrick N, Briggs M, Zidenberg-Cherr S. 2007. California teachers support the Nutrition Competencies new nutrition instruction guidelines. Hilgardia 61(1):40-46. DOI:10.3733/ca.v061n01p40
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