Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Africanized bees, 1990–1995: Initial rapid invasion has slowed in the U.S.

Authors

P. Kirk Visscher
Richard S. Vetter
F. Chris Baptista

Authors Affiliations

P.K. Visscher is Assistant Professor, Department of Entomology, UC Riverside; R.S. Vetter is Staff Research Associate, Department of Entomology, UC Riverside; F.C. Baptista is Entomologist, Arizona Department of Agriculture, Phoenix, AZ.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 51(1):22-24. DOI:10.3733/ca.v051n01p22. January 1997.

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Abstract

Africanized honey bees (AHB) can seriously disrupt beekeeping and agricultural practices, as well as kill people. This study examines the progress of AHB in the United States from their first detection in 1990 through 1995. AHB are now established in southern portions of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. While the bees' northward migration has slowed dramatically in recent years, the ultimate extent of their range remains uncertain. AHB's impact on California agriculture will depend on how much of the state they colonize, and on the effectiveness of new beekeeping practices and management of AHB as an urban pest.

Visscher P, Vetter R, Baptista F. 1997. Africanized bees, 1990–1995: Initial rapid invasion has slowed in the U.S.. Hilgardia 51(1):22-24. DOI:10.3733/ca.v051n01p22
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