Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Pesticide applications can be reduced by forecasting the occurrence of fireblight bacteria

Authors

Sherman V. Thomson
Milton N. Schroth
William J. Moller
Wilbur O. Reil
James A. Beutel
Clarence S. Davis

Authors Affiliations

Sherman V. Thomson is Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, Berkeley; Milton N. Schroth is Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, Berkeley; William J. Moller is Plant Pathologist, Cooperative Extension, Department of Plant Pathology, Davis; Wilbur O. Reil is Staff Research Associate, Cooperative Extension, Department of Plant Pathology, Davis; James A. Beutel is Cooperative Extension Specialist, Department of Pomology, Davis; Clarence S. Davis is Entomologist, Cooperative Extension, Berkeley.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 31(10):12-14. DOI:10.3733/ca.v031n10p12. October 1977.

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Abstract

Fireblight, caused by the bacterium Erwinio amylovora, is an erratic and devastating disease of pear orchards. Native to North America, it was first observed in California in the 1890s after slowly crossing the continent from the east, decimating pear orchards in its path. Fireblight has the potential to destroy an established orchard in one season if uncontrolled. With 37,440 acres of hearing trees producing a crop of 353,500 tons valued at $44 million, California pear producers have traditionally spared little in their protection efforts to keep the disease in check.

Thomson S, Schroth M, Moller W, Reil W, Beutel J, Davis C. 1977. Pesticide applications can be reduced by forecasting the occurrence of fireblight bacteria. Hilgardia 31(10):12-14. DOI:10.3733/ca.v031n10p12
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