Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Sex pheromone traps determine need for codling moth control in apple and pear orchards

Authors

Richard S. Bethell
Louis A. Falcon
William C. Batiste
Gordon W. Morehead
Edio P. Delfino

Authors Affiliations

R. Bethell Farm Advisors in El Dorado and Sacramento Counties; L. A. Falcon is Associate Insect Pathologist, Division of Entomology, University of California, Berkeley; W. Batiste is Assistant Entomologist, Division of Entomology, University of California, Berkeley; G. Morehead are Farm Advisors in El Dorado and Sacramento Counties; E. Delfino is Agricultural Commissioner in El Dorado County.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 26(5):10-12. DOI:10.3733/ca.v026n05p10. May 1972.

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Abstract

For several decades growers of pears and apples in California have controlled the codling moth by coating the fruit with chemical insecticides from petal fall through harvest. This preventive approach was necessary because growers lacked effective methods for determining codling moth activity and abundance in their orchards. While this approach has provided effective control, repeated applications of heavy dosages of broad-spectrum, persistent chemical insecticides have been expensive and disruptive to the environment. Beneficial organisms are destroyed which help regulate the abundance of other pests such as spider mites, aphids, and pear psylla. Released from their natural enemies, these pests frequently reach damaging levels, requiring additional pesticide treatments for their control.

Bethell R, Falcon L, Batiste W, Morehead G, Delfino E. 1972. Sex pheromone traps determine need for codling moth control in apple and pear orchards. Hilgardia 26(5):10-12. DOI:10.3733/ca.v026n05p10
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