Hilgardia
Hilgardia
Hilgardia
University of California
Hilgardia

Compacted golf greens respond to deep aeration, controlled irrigation: Los Angeles County tests

Authors

J. Letey
L. H. Stolzy
Wayne Morgan

Authors Affiliations

J. Letey is Assistant Professor of Soil Physics; L. H. Stolzy is Associate Soil Physicist, Department of Soils and Plant Nutrition, University of California, Riverside; Wayne Morgan is Farm Advisor, Los Angeles County.

Publication Information

Hilgardia 18(6):8-10. DOI:10.3733/ca.v018n06p8. June 1964.

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Abstract

Costly reconstruction of old compacted golf and bowling greens can be avoided by drilling holes at regular intervals and backfilling with a suitable growth medium, according to the southern California tests reported in the two accompanying articles. Extension Service assistance at Arrowhead Country Club, San Bernardino County, in 1961 and 1962 resulted in tests showing that deep aeration plus irrigation control increased root activity and, at the same time, reduced the amount of water needed to maintain acceptable turf during the fall and early winter by 50 to 60%. Tests last year at Arcadia, Los Angeles County, substantiated the earlier results with data showing that the 3-inch holes drilled by the usual machine—“aerators” are less effective for healthy regrowth than holes drilled to a depth of 8 inches.

Letey J, Stolzy L, Morgan W. 1964. Compacted golf greens respond to deep aeration, controlled irrigation: Los Angeles County tests. Hilgardia 18(6):8-10. DOI:10.3733/ca.v018n06p8
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